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Trinity Standard - Local News

Copyright 2011 - Polk County Publishing Company

Census count tops 14,500 for county
Trinity Standard -

TRINITY – While the population of Trinity County as a whole climbed by almost 6 percent since 2000, last year’s head count indi-cated declines for both the cities of Trinity and Groveton. According to figures released by the U.S. Census Bureau last week, the population of the county grew to 14,585 people in 2010. The figure was based on the con-stitutionally mandated decennial census conducted last year. The release of the state and local census numbers means that the redistricting effort throughout Texas will begin to move into high gear. Under the “one man, one vote” principal of the U.S. Constitution, all U.S. representatives, state senate and state representative districts have to be balanced in terms of population. The same will apply locally for the Trinity County precinct lines, which will have to be redrawn to insure each commissioner, justice of the peace and constable represents roughly the same number of people. According to the censes data for Texas, which was released Thurs-day, Feb. 17, Trinity County’s 2010 population was up by 806 people or 5.8 percent from the 2000 count of 13,779. The City of Trinity, which had a 2010 count of 2,697, was down by 24 people or 0.8 percent from the 2000 figure of 2,721. The latest census count for Gro-veton listed a total population of 1,057, which was down by 50 or 4.5 percent from the 1,107 recorded in 2000. Although not an incorporated area, the 2010 census also listed a population of 1,162 people for the Westwood Shores CDP (Census Designated Place). While the 2010 total is the high-est ever recorded for Trinity Coun-ty, the 5.8 percent growth rate was down significantly from the more than 20 percent growth recorded after the 1980, 1990 and 2000 counts. The highest rate of growth for the county, however, came between 1880 and 1910 during the “timber boom” experienced in many parts of East Texas. The rising demand for building materials caused an economic and population boom in the area as thousands moved to the area to harvest the area’s dense pine forests. During that 30-year period, the county’s population exploded from 4,915 in 1880 up to 12,768 by 1910 – a jump of almost 160 percent. The population continued to grow at a slower pace up until the 1940s when the census numbers began to decline. From a high of 13,705 in 1940, the local number fell to 7,539 by 1960. After the completion of Lake Li-vingston in the early 1970s, the downward population trend came to an end and the county once again began to grow. In 2000 the census count of 13,779 set a new record. According to the latest census figures, the racial makeup of the county is primarily white, with 12,302 people or 84.3 percent of the total population. The next largest group was Afri-can Americans with a total of 1,378 or 9.4 percent. A total of 215 people (1.5%) were listed as being of two or more races; 69 (0.5%) were American Indian or Alaskan natives; 42 (0.3%) were Asian; three were identified as native Hawaiian of other Pacific islanders; and 576 (3.9%) were listed as “some other race.” The latest census figures for counties neighboring Trinity Coun-ty include: • Angelina County, which was listed with a 2010 population of 86,771, up by 6,641 people (8.3%) from the 2000 census of 80,130. • Houston County, which was listed with a 2010 population of 23,732, up by 547 people (2.4%) from the 2000 census of 23,185. • Polk County, which was listed with a 2010 population of 45,413 up by 4,280 people (10.4%) from the 2000 census count of 41,133. • San Jacinto County, which was listed with a 2010 population of 26,384, up by 4,138 people (18.6%) from the 2000 census count of 22,246. • Walker County, which was listed with a 2010 population of 67,861, up by 6,103 people (9.9%) from the 2000 census total of 61,758 Estimated populations for other area cities include: • Coldspring, which was listed with a 2010 population of 853, up by 162 people (23.4%) from the 2000 census total of 691. • Crockett, which was listed with a 2010 population of 6,950, down by 191 people (-2.7%) from the 2000 census count of 7,141. • Huntsville, which was listed with a 2010 population of 38,548, up by 3,470 people (9.9%) from the 2000 census total of 35,078. • Livingston, which was listed with a 2010 population of 5,335, down by 98 people (-1.8%) from the 2000 census total of 5,433. • Lovelady, which was listed with a 2010 population of 649, up by 41 people (6.7%) from the 2000 census of 608. • Lufkin, which was listed with a 2010 population of 35,067, up by 2,358 people (7.2%) from the 2000 census count of 32,709. • Onalaska, which was listed with a 2010 population of 1,764, up by 590 people (50.3%) from the 2000 census count of 1,174. • Riverside, which was listed with a 2010 population of 510, up by 85 people (20%) from the 2000 census of 425. Texas’ population also expe-rienced substantial growth since 2000. Last year’s count placed the state’s population at 25,145,561 – an increase of 4,293,741 people (20.6%) from the 2000 census figure of 20,851,820. .

 

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